science

SOURCES & PROBLEMS IN RENAISSANCE MEDICINE. Rewriting the History of European Medicine

This lecture explains the rationale behind the new survey of history in the period, which relies on a wide range of primary and unfamiliar texts drawn from across Europe from Moldavia to Portugal. It considers the consequences for medicine of the opening up of Europe to the wider world, as well as the results of the ever-hardening religious divide, including the fate of Arabic medicine in Iberia.

Astronomy in the Great Mosque of Damascus: Towards a Social History of Mamluk Astronomy

Join us at the Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Durham University, 7 Owengate, Durham, DH1 3HB, on March 15 at 5:00 p.m. to hear Yusuf Tayara of the Oxford University History Department present his research on ‘Astronomy in the Great Mosque of Damascus: Towards a Social History of Mamluk Astronomy’.

Sustainability Narratives: Seeing Environmental Transformation in Medieval Nordic Literature

Online Event by Oslo School of Environmental Humanities In this talk, Old Norse philologists Stefka G. Eriksen will introduce a new research initiative ‘Sustainability Narratives’ (SUSTAIN), which will discuss the role of literature and narratives of all mediums in environmental and societal transformations in the medieval North.

St. Albert the Great: Medieval Wisdom for Modern Science | Online Science and Religion Series

Online Event by Angelicum Thomistic Institute Register here: angelicum.it/event/st-albert-the-great-medieval-wisdom-for-modern-science/… St. Albert the Great: Medieval Wisdom for Modern Science Fr. Thomas Davenport, OP The Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas 16 November 2021 7pm live from the Angelicum, Rome 7pm CET / 6pm GMT / 1pm EST You can live-stream this talk here on Facebook or on YouTube without registering, but if you register, we will send you a Zoom link via email and you will have an opportunity to submit questions to the speaker after the talk.  

Healing with Poisons: Potent Medicines in Medieval China (2021)

Healing with Poisons explores the ways physicians, religious devotees, court officials, and laypeople used powerful substances to both treat intractable illnesses and enhance life.

The Light Ages: The Surprising Story of Medieval Science (2020)

An illuminating guide to the scientific and technological achievements of the Middle Ages through the life of a crusading astronomer-monk. Soaring Gothic cathedrals, violent crusades, the Black Death: these are the dramatic forces that shaped the medieval era. But the so-called Dark Ages also gave us the first universities, eyeglasses, and mechanical clocks. As medieval thinkers sought to understand the world around them, from the passing of the seasons to the stars in the sky, they came to develop a vibrant scientific culture.

Reason & Revelation in the Middle Ages (2020)

Etienne Gilson Reason and Revelation in the Middle Ages, first delivered as the Richard Lectures in 1937, was published in 1938 and became an immediate success. Not only does it contribute to a major question of debate in Christian, Jewish, and Islamic philosophy and religion in the medieval period but it also insists on the validity of truth obtainable through reason as well as revelation, on rational argument alongside religious faith. This message is as important in the twenty-first century as it was in the fourth century of the young Augustine, the thirteenth of St Thomas Aquinas, and the twentieth of the mature Gilson.--

Toxicology in the Middle Ages & Renaissance (2017)

The book approximately covers the 1100s through the 1600s, delving into different aspects of toxicology, such as the contributions of scientific scholars of the time, sensational poisoners and poisoning cases, as well as myths. Historical figures, such as the Borgias and Catherine de Medici are discussed. Toxicologists, students, medical researchers, and those interested in the history of science will find insightful and relevant material in this volume.

Aristotle’s Children: How Christians, Muslims, & Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom & Illuminated the Middle Ages (2004)

Europe was in the long slumber of the Middle Ages, the Roman Empire was in tatters, and the Greek language was all but forgotten, until a group of twelfth-century scholars rediscovered and translated the works of Aristotle. His ideas spread like wildfire across Europe, offering the scientific view that the natural world, including the soul of man, was a proper subject of study. The rediscovery of these ancient ideas sparked riots and heresy trials, caused major upheavals in the Catholic Church, and also set the stage for today's rift between reason and religion. In Aristotle's Children, Richard Rubenstein transports us back in history, rendering the controversies of the Middle Ages lively and accessible-and allowing us to understand the philosophical ideas that are fundamental to modern...

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